Posts Tagged ‘Jute’

DIY Framed Holiday Card Display


There are a lot of things that/whom I love, but today’s post I am going to focus on just a few of the million: Holiday/Christmas cards, a bargain, and jute twine. When these three powers (things) combined, here comes Captain Planet DIY Frame Holiday Card Display. 

December is the month for mail correspondence, and if you don’t remember, I looovvvve some good ole fashioned correspondence.  I love all the beautiful pictures of my friends and their families, the fonts, the designs, etc. I just love it, and it is always nice to get something personal in the mail besides another Pottery Barn Catalog (don’t get me wrong, I love PB’s catalogs…). But what do you do once you open those gorgeous holiday/Christmas cards? 

I originally tried to use my Chicken Wire Frame, but that proved to be too small since I am soooooo popular and the cards kept rolling in. 

Luckily, I happened upon another favorite thing in Michael’s. I found a huge empty frame for $5 (marked down to $8. but I had coupons, holllllleerrrr), and because I have a bevvy of jute twine and upholstery webbing (because I looooove burlap, twine, etc. ) I quickly whipped up a solution. 


So, ladies (and gents?), I bring you my DIY Framed Holiday Card Display.

DIY Christmas Card Display


Here’s what you’ll need for your DIY Framed Holiday Card Display:

- Large frame— You don’t need the glass, the board, etc. Just the frame. May I suggest

- Staples and a Staple Gun– If you don’t have one, run and get one.. I use that puppy for everything.

- Assorted twine/jute/burlap rope, ribbon, etc. ( has the hook-up!) 

- Clothespins– assorted sizes, although, even those those super tiny ones are cute, they break on me left and right. 

Here’s what you’ll do for your DIY Framed Holiday Card Display:


Lay out your lines. I alternated between webbing, burlap straps, and jute twine. I did make sure my lines were level, but because I left some give in my lines, the twine does droop a little once the cards are on it. I’m cool with that. If you are not, then staple securely, friends. 


Here’s the finished product. 




Once you think it is socially appropriate to take down the holiday decor, this frame could function as a place to display artwork, pictures, etc. 

How do you display your Christmas/Holiday Cards? I am sure there are some brilliant and beautiful ideas out there! 

Jute Cross Wall Art

In the weeks leading up to Easter, I’d wanted to make something that showcased a cross. It’s always nice to have a few Easter-specific decorations to add to the overall spring décor.

I’ve liked the look of the nail art that took Pinterest by storm earlier this year. You’ve probably seen it; usually it’s a state outline such as this one. Given its materials, to me, this would be the perfect means for my Easter cross.

I chose to work with jute for this project (I’ve got tons left over from my wrapped Easter eggs). I’m sure you could use twine, yarn, or string as well.

Jute Cross

What you need:

Wood- we have plenty of remnants from which to choose

Fine grit sandpaper

Circular Saw- if you need to cut your wood

Stain or paint

Stain rag or paintbrush

Clear finish- I used some that we had on hand





Step 1:

Using a circular saw cut your wood down to the size/shape you want it to be. I settled on a good old fashioned rectangle. This will be leaning against a wall on a shelf, so I didn’t make it that large, only 10.5 x 13. Give your wood a quick sand to ensure there are no jagged pieces anywhere.

Step 2:

Stain or paint your wood. I wanted to keep the natural look of the wood so I decided on stain. I’ve used Minwax before and was happy with the results—this time I went with the color Provincial. Follow the directions on your stain can to make sure you use the correct procedure. After your stain dries, apply a coat of finish. Let dry completely- I decided to let it dry overnight and pick up with the rest of the project the next day.

Step 3:

I did a quick sketch of my cross on paper so I could choose the shape/size I wanted it to be. I also made sure to decide on where I wanted my nails to go. I settled with only doing nails in the corners of the cross—quite different from the state nail art that uses tons of nails.

Step 4:

Lay your sketch on top of your wood. You could just hammer in your nails where you want them to go, and when finished, tear away your paper. However, I chose to use an awl to mark where my nails would go. I then took off the paper and got to hammering. Remember not to nail them all the way down—you need to have nail exposed to wrap the jute around!

jutecross photos

Step 5:

Now that you have your outline/nails in place, start wrapping. Make sure you tie a knot around your first and last nails so it doesn’t unravel. I chose to keep my wrapping to a minimum because I wanted this design to be simplistic and not too “perfect” looking.

jute cross

      I’m quite happy with how this came out. It’s a nice nod to the meaning behind the holiday.



Jute & Twine Wrapped Easter Eggs

If you’ve had a winter like us here in Maryland, you are awaiting the arrival of Spring with bated breath. Although the outdoors may not reflect Spring weather quite yet, there’s no reason your indoors can’t begin showcasing some warmth and happiness.

When it comes to decorating for the Spring & Easter, I like to bring the outside in—which means green & natural with a smidge of rustic. Some jute and twine wrapped eggs were a good craft to kick off my spring decorating.

Jute Wrapped Easter Egg

What you need:

  • Plastic Easter Eggs
  • Twine
  • Jute
  • Hot Glue Gun

Step 1:

Gather your eggs. I bought 2 sizes of the plastic eggs because I wanted a bit of variety. I found my eggs at Hobby Lobby for $1.00 —score! I decided to place a dab of hot glue where the 2 egg halves come together to seal it closed. I wasn’t sure if the egg would pop open as I was wrapping, and didn’t want to deal with that possible disaster.Easter Eggs

Step 2:

Warm up your glue gun, find some filler TV show, and get to wrapping. I chose to start wrapping the jute at the base/bigger end of my eggs. I found it helpful to wind a bit of the jute/twine and then glue it to the base. Glue and wrap on repeat until the entire egg is covered. I was able to get 3 eggs done before an hour TV show came to an end.

Jute Wrapped Eggs

Here’s something to consider: The jute eggs went much faster than the twine eggs. I only had very thin twine on hand, so it took a bit longer to work with in order to ensure that it was wrapped tightly (no gaps) around the egg. I do enjoy the look of both textures, but in the future I might go with a heavier twine!

Here they are, all ready to find a home somewhere in my house:

Jute Wrapped Easter Egg

                                 I really like them! It’s a nice change from the bright colored eggs                                     that everyone else seems to have.

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