Posts Tagged ‘DIY’

A Vintage Meets Modern Wedding

Our good friend Jen recently tied the knot at the Visionary Art Museum in downtown Baltimore.This beautiful venue was the perfect backdrop for the vintage meets modern wedding. Her colors were a collection of muted, summery tones with a fresh, romantic feeling. Jen’s big day featured so many adorable DIYed details, we just had to share. Look at the happy couple. Doesn’t Jen look absolutely radiant?! Ben, the groom, cleaned up nicely as well. Oh and that dress…

vintage wedding 1Twist46 Twist224The cocktail hour and reception featured handmade pinwheel place card holders, DIYed bar and dinner menus.The couple also showcased family wedding photos dating back to the 1800s. The invitations and coordinating signature cocktail beer label were custom designed by a friend. All of the details meshed seamlessly and the result was a classically elegant look that echoed the modern appeal of the venue.

vintage wedding 3jen's wedding 3

jen's wedding 2Twist521Twist998Thank you Jen and Ben for letting us share your beautiful big day! Also a shout out to Twist Photography for the gorgeous photos.

DIY Jewelry Storage

Growing up with a grandfather who was a jeweler wasn’t a bad gig. There were many hours of show and tell, and even the fortunate bonus of getting handmade jewelry for ‘life milestones’. Each item crafted by my grandpa is very special to us grandkids and we all treasure these family heirlooms. Sadly, this unique talent skipped right over me, but it certainly resonates in my sister.

We all know those girls who love the glitz and glam things in life. My sister, Michelle, is one of those girls. If it has glitter, rhinestones, or anything sparkly, it’s the thing for her. What started when she was little with bedazzling all of her clothes, has now turned into the hobby of jewelry making. True, my grandpa worked with real jewels and fine metals, but Michelle’s jewelry is nothing to brush aside. Since she is constantly making and selling jewelry, the arsenal of earrings and necklaces she has assembled is quite impressive. For her birthday, I knew that she would appreciate (and actually use) another means for her to store her creations. I may not be able to make jewelry, but I knew I could make some sort of jewelry holder.

I’m sure you’ve seen lots of ideas for jewelry storage online, so you can consider this just another one to add to the mix!

What you need:

Frame—I got mine at Hobby Lobby on super clearance

Radiator Grill/Screen

Metal cutter/shears

Spraypaint (optional)

S Hooks

 

Step 1:

Spray paint your frame. My sister’s room has the color scheme of a peacock feather—the walls are bright purplish pink, and the accents are golds and blues. Subdued isn’t quite a word that one associates with my sister. To go with this color scheme, I decided to spray paint the frame a deep purple color.

P1030371

Step 2:

Cut your radiator grille. I found my metal screen at Home Depot. They had four patterns that came in aluminum, gold, and a bronzish color. I went with gold because Michelle already has that color as an accent in her room. I think that purple and gold are very regal colors, and Michelle always jokes that she is the queen, so it was a perfect fit!

P1030376 I used some metal cutting shears and cut it down to size. You’ll notice that some of the corners are cut on an angle—this is where the little hooks are that enable you to hang it on the wall. I wasn’t sure if she wanted it horizontal or vertical on her wall, so I was sure to leave these hooks free from the screen.

 P1030380

The screen itself was about $30, and I certainly will be using all of the remnants to create something else—maybe some jewelry holders for myself.

Step 3:

Secure your grill onto the back of the frame. I used a stapler to do this, and it worked like a charm. Step back and admire your handiwork!

stapled

Step 4:

Place your S hooks through the holes in the screen. I chose to hold off on this step until I gave it to my sister as I didn’t know if she would use this for necklaces, bracelets, or both. We stuck the S hooks in when she knew which jewelry it would hold.

fnished

Here it is when it was all said and done and up on her crazy colored wall:

mom1 finito

 What do you think? This craft is not only practical, but couldn’t have been any easier to make. It took all of 5 minutes to physically put together. I’m looking forward to making one of my own sometime soon—although I can guarantee you it won’t be purple and gold! 

 

 

Ikea Hack: Armoire Storage Upgrade Part One

If you have a craft room or designated area in your house, you are one lucky person. I had a corner in one of our extra bedrooms, and it was, shall we say, slowly starting to creep out of its designated corner. With my Joann bags of craft supplies starting to run amok, it was time to find a more permanent storage solution.

An armoire would give ample storage, but boy are some of those suckers expensive! I looked at some gently loved pieces that we could modify and paint, but for the existing price and work we would have to put in to refresh the piece, new seemed like the way to go.

Lo and behold IKEA had an unfinished pine wardrobe that seemed to fit the bill. Who knew IKEA sold unfinished furniture? Determined to get in and out of IKEA, we set out strictly to see the FJELL Armoire. We saw it, we loved it, we bought it.

image from ikea.com

image from ikea.com

I liked the fact it was unfinished—I wouldn’t have to fix dents, sand existing paint, etc. I also liked the style, it kind of had a barn look going for it. The only thing that would have to be modified was the interior of the cabinet. As this wasn’t going to be used as a wardrobe, we needed shelving instead of a clothes rack. An easy fix for my husband!

We first had to assemble the armoire—for anyone who has ever put together IKEA furniture, you know what this can be like. It took us almost 2 hours, but finally it was standing upright. As you can see it is a large piece of furniture, measuring 81 7/8” high, by 43 ¼” wide, by 25 ¼” deep.  

standingWe made one modification during the assembly process. We didn’t like the flimsy particleboard backing that came with the piece, so we cut down a ¼” piece of pine plywood instead. Also, we did not leave the entire back solid, as you can see in the photo below. We wanted air to circulate and also allow the possibility for electrical cords to come out of the back, should we want to put something electronic in there in the future.

cut outsNext up was the shelving. We decided that we wanted a space for 2 large Tupperware, a slightly shorter space for 2 baskets, a smaller space to serve as a catch-all for whatever, and then a shelf for my sewing machine and its components. I wanted the sewing machine shelf at as close to chest level as possible so I wouldn’t have to bend over too far to get it, or get out a chair in order to reach it.

I want to mention that before we measured or cut the wood for the shelves, I first went out and purchased the large Tupperware containers and storage baskets. I didn’t wind up using baskets at all—instead I found crates that had a barn wood look to them.

To fit my storage goodies, our shelf heights wound up at 21” from the bottom of the armoire for the lowest space, at 35” for the middle space, and at 42” for the top space.

shelvingTo construct the shelves, we used ¾” oak plywood that we already had on hand. The cubbies are not only practical, but necessary for the structural integrity of the shelves–the vertical wood will ensure that the shelf will not sag in the middle.

Starting from the bottom, we centered the vertical wood under the lowest shelf. We used two self-boring wood screws for each horizontal shelf on each side of the armoire, screwing them in from the outside of the armoire.

We then used 2 wood screws drilling through the top of each horizontal shelf into the standing vertical wood. We continued this method as we worked our way up the shelving, and those things aren’t going anywhere! The shelves are solid and ready to hold all of my crafting supplies.

We applied wood filler to the holes on the outside of the armoire and gave it a sanding. It was all ready to be primed and painted, but that’s another project for another day!

Stay tuned for Part 2 where we try our hand at using a paint sprayer for the first time!

 

1 2 3 4 5 6 11