Posts Tagged ‘Tutorial’

DIY Jewelry Storage

Growing up with a grandfather who was a jeweler wasn’t a bad gig. There were many hours of show and tell, and even the fortunate bonus of getting handmade jewelry for ‘life milestones’. Each item crafted by my grandpa is very special to us grandkids and we all treasure these family heirlooms. Sadly, this unique talent skipped right over me, but it certainly resonates in my sister.

We all know those girls who love the glitz and glam things in life. My sister, Michelle, is one of those girls. If it has glitter, rhinestones, or anything sparkly, it’s the thing for her. What started when she was little with bedazzling all of her clothes, has now turned into the hobby of jewelry making. True, my grandpa worked with real jewels and fine metals, but Michelle’s jewelry is nothing to brush aside. Since she is constantly making and selling jewelry, the arsenal of earrings and necklaces she has assembled is quite impressive. For her birthday, I knew that she would appreciate (and actually use) another means for her to store her creations. I may not be able to make jewelry, but I knew I could make some sort of jewelry holder.

I’m sure you’ve seen lots of ideas for jewelry storage online, so you can consider this just another one to add to the mix!

What you need:

Frame—I got mine at Hobby Lobby on super clearance

Radiator Grill/Screen

Metal cutter/shears

Spraypaint (optional)

S Hooks

 

Step 1:

Spray paint your frame. My sister’s room has the color scheme of a peacock feather—the walls are bright purplish pink, and the accents are golds and blues. Subdued isn’t quite a word that one associates with my sister. To go with this color scheme, I decided to spray paint the frame a deep purple color.

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Step 2:

Cut your radiator grille. I found my metal screen at Home Depot. They had four patterns that came in aluminum, gold, and a bronzish color. I went with gold because Michelle already has that color as an accent in her room. I think that purple and gold are very regal colors, and Michelle always jokes that she is the queen, so it was a perfect fit!

P1030376 I used some metal cutting shears and cut it down to size. You’ll notice that some of the corners are cut on an angle—this is where the little hooks are that enable you to hang it on the wall. I wasn’t sure if she wanted it horizontal or vertical on her wall, so I was sure to leave these hooks free from the screen.

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The screen itself was about $30, and I certainly will be using all of the remnants to create something else—maybe some jewelry holders for myself.

Step 3:

Secure your grill onto the back of the frame. I used a stapler to do this, and it worked like a charm. Step back and admire your handiwork!

stapled

Step 4:

Place your S hooks through the holes in the screen. I chose to hold off on this step until I gave it to my sister as I didn’t know if she would use this for necklaces, bracelets, or both. We stuck the S hooks in when she knew which jewelry it would hold.

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Here it is when it was all said and done and up on her crazy colored wall:

mom1 finito

 What do you think? This craft is not only practical, but couldn’t have been any easier to make. It took all of 5 minutes to physically put together. I’m looking forward to making one of my own sometime soon—although I can guarantee you it won’t be purple and gold! 

 

 

Ikea Hack: Armoire Storage Upgrade Part One

If you have a craft room or designated area in your house, you are one lucky person. I had a corner in one of our extra bedrooms, and it was, shall we say, slowly starting to creep out of its designated corner. With my Joann bags of craft supplies starting to run amok, it was time to find a more permanent storage solution.

An armoire would give ample storage, but boy are some of those suckers expensive! I looked at some gently loved pieces that we could modify and paint, but for the existing price and work we would have to put in to refresh the piece, new seemed like the way to go.

Lo and behold IKEA had an unfinished pine wardrobe that seemed to fit the bill. Who knew IKEA sold unfinished furniture? Determined to get in and out of IKEA, we set out strictly to see the FJELL Armoire. We saw it, we loved it, we bought it.

image from ikea.com

image from ikea.com

I liked the fact it was unfinished—I wouldn’t have to fix dents, sand existing paint, etc. I also liked the style, it kind of had a barn look going for it. The only thing that would have to be modified was the interior of the cabinet. As this wasn’t going to be used as a wardrobe, we needed shelving instead of a clothes rack. An easy fix for my husband!

We first had to assemble the armoire—for anyone who has ever put together IKEA furniture, you know what this can be like. It took us almost 2 hours, but finally it was standing upright. As you can see it is a large piece of furniture, measuring 81 7/8” high, by 43 ¼” wide, by 25 ¼” deep.  

standingWe made one modification during the assembly process. We didn’t like the flimsy particleboard backing that came with the piece, so we cut down a ¼” piece of pine plywood instead. Also, we did not leave the entire back solid, as you can see in the photo below. We wanted air to circulate and also allow the possibility for electrical cords to come out of the back, should we want to put something electronic in there in the future.

cut outsNext up was the shelving. We decided that we wanted a space for 2 large Tupperware, a slightly shorter space for 2 baskets, a smaller space to serve as a catch-all for whatever, and then a shelf for my sewing machine and its components. I wanted the sewing machine shelf at as close to chest level as possible so I wouldn’t have to bend over too far to get it, or get out a chair in order to reach it.

I want to mention that before we measured or cut the wood for the shelves, I first went out and purchased the large Tupperware containers and storage baskets. I didn’t wind up using baskets at all—instead I found crates that had a barn wood look to them.

To fit my storage goodies, our shelf heights wound up at 21” from the bottom of the armoire for the lowest space, at 35” for the middle space, and at 42” for the top space.

shelvingTo construct the shelves, we used ¾” oak plywood that we already had on hand. The cubbies are not only practical, but necessary for the structural integrity of the shelves–the vertical wood will ensure that the shelf will not sag in the middle.

Starting from the bottom, we centered the vertical wood under the lowest shelf. We used two self-boring wood screws for each horizontal shelf on each side of the armoire, screwing them in from the outside of the armoire.

We then used 2 wood screws drilling through the top of each horizontal shelf into the standing vertical wood. We continued this method as we worked our way up the shelving, and those things aren’t going anywhere! The shelves are solid and ready to hold all of my crafting supplies.

We applied wood filler to the holes on the outside of the armoire and gave it a sanding. It was all ready to be primed and painted, but that’s another project for another day!

Stay tuned for Part 2 where we try our hand at using a paint sprayer for the first time!

 

DIY Book Covers

The largest project my husband and I have done in our house is the built in entertainment center for our first floor. It took lots of brainstorming and planning to make this from scratch, but we are beyond thrilled with the results.

After it went up, we quickly filled it with books and some baubles that went with our sailing/nautical-lite theme.  As the months went by, I found myself tinkering with the items on the shelves as well as the layout… I was just not pleased with how it looked.

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Here’s a close up of the shelves— they were too cluttered/a bit too full for my liking. We used a textured wallpaper (similar to grass cloth) for the back of the bookshelves—I wish it photographed more like it actually looks! Forgive the TV wires… we haven’t put them through the cabinets yet!

Optimized-before up close

 

After de-cluttering and shifting some things around, I found a layout that I could live with.

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Now that I liked how the shelves were more open, I wanted to make the whole thing blend together. I was not a fan of the mishmash of cover colors and wanted to do a subtle theme of blues, greens, and creams—this would match much better with the rest of the décor in the room.

My husband thought I was insane when I told him I was going to recover the books. When I removed the paper cover, some of the hardcover books were already blue or cream, so that worked to my advantage. It was mostly the paperbacks that I had to deal with.

As I wanted to print on the covers, I referenced/modified this in depth tutorial from the blog The Precious Little Things in Life.

Here’s how I covered my books.

 

What you need:

Books

Paper (I found some large paper at Hobby Lobby and used brown shipping paper that I  

             already had leftover from Christmas)

Scissors

Tape

Measuring Tape

Ruler

Printer

Microsoft Word

photo 1 

 

Step 1:

First I had to determine what color I wanted each book to be. I did a rough sketch of our books in the layout that I liked and then assigned each book that was getting covered a color.

Step 2:

Line up your books and group those of the same height together. Under each category of height, I listed the individual measurements for those titles.

Step 3:

Measure your books. You need two measurements, the height of the book, which you already measured, and the book’s circumference. Find the book’s circumference by placing the lip of your measuring tape on the backside of the book, wrap around the spine, and across the front cover.

photo

When you have all of these written down, you are ready to start covering your books. It would have been lovely if I had books that were the same height and circumferences, but alas every book was slightly different. This would have saved me some time cutting out the paper (I could have cut multiple sheets at once). Maybe you will be luckier than I was.

Step 4:

These directions might vary ever so slightly for you, as I was using Microsoft Word 2011 for Mac. In Microsoft Word, navigate to Page Set Up.

file page setup

In the Page Set Up box, find Paper Size, and go to Manage Custom Sizes—this is where you will type in your measurements to ensure a perfect fit.

In the Manage Custom Sizes box, the Width box is where you will type the height of the book. The Height box is where you will then type the circumference  measurement. You can see this in the picture below, as well as the fact that I chose to make my top, bottom, left, and right margins 0.

page setup

Your page will now look tall and narrow—this is what you want in order to print the title.

Step 5:

Now that you know your page dimensions, you’re ready to cut your paper. Cut your paper to the same measurements that you typed in the Width and Height boxes. Once your paper is cut, put it in your printer (I had to use the manual feed tray in the back of mine).

beo

Step 6:

You’re almost ready to type your book title onto the spine of your book cover.

You can vary the fonts and sizes to your liking—I chose to keep my font the same for every book. The only thing I changed was the font size. Some of my book spines were 2 inches while others were ¼ inch, therefore I used size 30 font for the bigger titles and size 14 font for the smaller. I printed out one regular old page of a few titles with font sizes of 14, 18, 22, 26, 30. I then held up this sheet to the books when I was ready to type the titles in order to eyeball which size was the best fit.

Step 7:

Remember where you typed the circumference of the book into the Height box? In my earlier photo it was 16.25. In order to type your title perfectly centered on your book cover, you need to take your circumference measurement and divide it by 2.

For example, 16.25/2 = 8.125.  Hit enter until you bring your cursor down to roughly 8.125. So long as you are in the ballpark of that number, you will be fine.

Center your cursor, and type in your title and author.

centered text

Step 8:

With your paper in the printer and title typed up, go ahead and print.

Lay your book on the printed paper and pull until the title is centered on the spine. 

photo 3

Make a crease where the front/back covers end so you know where to fold your paper. Tape the cover in place.

covering

Step 9: (Optional)

I decided to lightly pinch/crease the spine so there was more definition around the edges.

covered books 

So there you have it– freshly covered books to go with the color scheme of your choice. Here are a few shots of the books on the shelves. (Pardon the wonky lighting in a few of the photos).

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Although it took a while, I enjoyed doing this project. It was kind of like a grown up version of covering your textbooks back in middle school! 

 

 

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